Weekend Update – June 21, 2015

No matter how old you are, people love getting gifts.

That may even be the case when you end up paying for them yourself.

Sometimes, that’s the real surprise.

Last year, for example, I received a surprise birthday gift when hitting one of those round numbers. It was a trip to my favorite city, New Orleans, and I was further surprised by friends and family that had assembled there and then individually popped up at totally unexpected times and places.

The real surprise was when I received the hotel bill and then subsequently the other bills. While I’ll be forever remembering the moment a tap on my shoulder at a busy restaurant announced, “Sir, your drinks are here,” only to turn around and see one of my sons unexpectedly turn up holding a platter of shots. Priceless, but as long as we’re talking about price, I think that I would have chosen less costly libations had I known what was to be in store for me.

In hindsight, though, it was a great gift, but I paid the price as many expect will be the case after years of the Federal Reserve injecting liquidity into the system and keeping interest rates at historic lows, much as is now occurring throughout Europe and the world.

Following the FOMC Statement release this past week was Janet Yellen’s press conference and as one person said to me, hers was the “best tightrope walking” he’d ever seen.

Janet Yellenda, has a nice ring to it and she certainly did a great job of staying on course while questions came at her trying their best to throw her off message. Many of those questions were posed to see her lose her tight cling to the carefully nuanced words that served to tantalize, while hinting of what was ahead.

Instead of seeing the gift for what it was, they wanted to know when the bill would be coming due and maybe who was going to end up holding the bag when the celebrations were all over.

Of course, there are those really sick people for whom the gift would be seeing someone else fail or fall off that tightrope wire, but Yellen was better than any gust of wind that could come her way.

For those that had so recently come to expect that perhaps the FOMC would raise interest rates with this past week’s statement release, the market made it clear that they considered the delay as a real gift, even if the celebration and enjoyment lasted just for a day or so.

Sooner or later, there’s also a price that needs to be paid.

That gift, withholding the interest rate increase that just a couple of weeks ago seemed as if it might come this past week, not only was being delayed, but perhaps being delayed all the way to September. As if that gift wasn’t enough, there was a suggestion that any rate increase wasn’t necessarily going to be part of a planned series of regular rate increases, as had been the practice during the Greenspan era.

Could it get any better? At least that was how most heard her words as she delicately balanced them against one another, saying only those things that could be construed by willing ears as “Laissez les bons temps rouler,” as they like to say in New Orleans.

On Thursday, the day after the FOMC Statement release and press conference, it didn’t seem that it could get any better, as the market celebrated what could only be interpreted as a gift for stock investors.

Still, the reality is that while we are winding down a monetary policy era that has likely been to the benefit of our stock markets, the rest of the world is now beginning on that path and may offer stiff winds for us as the bill gets tallied.

The gales coming from Europe were evident this past week as the market was also reacting to the tightrope walk that Greece was doing as it vacillated between being reasonable and unrealistic.

Telling its IMF and ECB safety nets that there were better safety nets out there, while forgetting that neither Russia nor China has ever saved anyone without exacting a price that makes simple interest paid to the IMF and ECB look absolutely charitable, our own markets swayed along with those cross currents of uncertainty.

There may be lots of those cross currents ahead, so that balancing skill may come in very handy while waiting for earnings season to begin again in July and offering the possibility of getting grounded in fundamental reality.

As usual, the week’s potential stock selections are classified as being in Traditional, Double-Dip Dividend, Momentum or “PEE” categories.

Last week marked the second consecutive week in which I didn’t open any new positions, something that would have been unimaginable to me at any point during the past 7 or more years. This coming week I can see more of the same, as there’s very little compelling news ahead to make we want to let go of the cash in my hand. As the bill may be ready to come due soon, I’d like to be ready with that cash on hand to balance the cha
llenge of uncertainty.

Of course, as is usually the case, once the reality of the bill finally settles in, most of the time that represents an opportunity to again start moving forward.

For now, unless there is some further compelling reason to come from upcoming GDP, Retail Sales, Employment Situation and JOLTS reports to believe that the economy is heating up sufficiently to warrant a rate increase in July, the next catalyst may very well come from earnings.

This past week Oracle (NYSE:ORCL) reported earnings. It is among a very small handful of significant companies that report late in the cycle. In fact, their report was almost 3 months following the close of the quarter upon which they reported. While many of those reported soon after earnings season started, less than 2 weeks after the close of that quarter, the expectation for currency related revenue declines was so high at that time, that those companies didn’t see stock prices harshly punished for the dollar’s strength.

Now? Not so much.

Most, in fact, took the previous earnings report opportunity to provide decreased forward guidance as the expectation was that we were headed for US Dollar and Euro parity.

Nearly 3 months later that projection hasn’t become reality, as the US dollar has weakened significantly since March 31, 2015 and that can be expected to show up in the next quarter’s earnings reports. Unfortunately for Oracle share holders, had the company reported in April, there’s a chance that they would have gotten the same free pass as did others at that time.

Sinclair Broadcasting (NASDAQ:SBGI) and Comcast (NASDAQ:CMCSA) are both firmly in the control of their founding families and are on different ends of the spectrum when it comes to their approach to bringing content into the home.

The family nature of Comcast was highlighted this past Friday with the passing of its founder, Ralph Roberts, at age 95. My mother used to say, “they should never go younger,” and while I was never a fan of their product and service, the man was an outlier in many good ways.

With Comcast having recently been extricated from a potential buyout of another cable company, it’s also finding that there are opportunities outside of people’s television sets and streaming devices, as its ownership of Universal Studios makes it the beneficiary of some blockbuster movie releases.

On the downside, it is near its 52 week high as it gets ready to go ex-dividend the week after next. That gives some reason for pause, although neither Greece nor currency headwinds should be an issue, although rising interest rates can be particularly hurtful for a capital intensive company.

However, I especially like Monday ex-dividend dates and like the idea of being assigned early on those positions, as you can get an additional week of premium in exchange for giving up the dividend and holding the stock position for a shorter period of time than planned, while having the opportunity to re-invest the assignment proceeds into another position. With the availability of expanded weekly options on Comcast there are a number of different expiration dates that can be used in an effort to capture additional time premium or try to find the right balance between premium, dividend and time.

Sinclair Broadcasting is in the terrestrial business and just keeps getting larger and larger. It’s not particularly an exciting stock, but does trade with a fairly large price range without any particularly moving news.

It is now at a price that is still above its range mid-point, but that however, has been a reliable launching pad for new positions. With only monthly options available the time commitment is longer as the July 2015 cycle begins this coming week. With earnings coming during the August 2015 cycle any short term price decline necessitating a rollover may look to bypass additional earnings risk and go to a September 2015 expiration, which would also include an upcoming dividend.

Philip Morris (NYSE:PM) and Blackberry (NASDAQ:BBRY) can both elicit some emotional responses, but for very different reasons. Both have upcoming events this week that can offer some opportunity.

Philip Morris is ex-dividend this week and that dividend is very attractive. The company recently stopped its aggressive buyback program as it was feeling the pain of currency exchange and did so, ostensibly, in favor of the dividend. With a history of annual dividend increases coming for the third quarter of each year, there is some question as to wh
ether that will be possible this year, as cash flow is decreased from both currency and declining sales.

Earnings are scheduled to be reported on the day prior to the end of the July 2015 monthly cycle, so in the event that shares haven’t been assigned prior to that, I would consider attempting to rollover any expiring option to a date that may give sufficient time to recover from any price decline.

Blackberry reports earnings this week and is sitting precariously near its yearly lows. The options market is implying an 8% price move when earnings are released on Tuesday morning.

Blackberry usually has released earnings on Friday mornings over the past few years and I’ve generally overlooked it because my preference is to sell a weekly put on most earnings related trades. I further prefer those that report early in the week, so as to have time for some price recovery if at risk for assignment, particularly as some price recovery could ease the ability to rollover the position to delay or avoid assignment.

With a Tuesday morning report and the chance of achieving a 1% ROI at a strike just outside the range implied by the options market, the interest in a short put position is rekindled. However, the greatest likelihood is that I would be more inclined to consider a put sale after earnings, if the price declines, as the premium can really get further enhanced as the price challenges that 52 week low.

I currently own shares of Dow Chemical (NYSE:DOW) and am at risk of having those shares assigned in order to capture the dividend. With those contracts expiring on July 2, 2015 and the ex-dividend date of Friday, June 26th, the $0.42 dividend would require a price of at least $53.92 for the $53.50 options to be assigned early. If that looks like a possibility as trading nears it close on Thursday, I may consider rolling over the option position in order to secure the dividend.

However, with any price decline in shares, particularly if coming early in the week, I would consider adding additional shares and again consider selling call options for the following, holiday shortened week, or even for the week afterward.

Dow Chemical has recently been trading well off its lows that were fueled by decreasing oil prices. CEO Andrew Liveris, who has come under fire on his own for allegedly using his position to finance his lifestyle, did an excellent job in convincing investors that Dow Chemical was a beneficiary of decreasing oil prices, rather than a victim, as it was being treated early in 2015, prior to his going on the offensive.

I think that even if oil prices head moderately higher in the near term, Andrew Liveris would be able to convince people that was also to the benefit of Dow Chemical, just as I expect he’ll be able to convince internal Dow Chemical “watch dogs” that his personal actions were entirely appropriate.

Finally, I had Bank of America (NYSE:BAC) shares assigned this past week, but following weakness among financials on Friday, as well as following the week’s peak in interest rates, shares declined.

That decline, although still leaving shares near a 6 month high, does provide another entry point opportunity. While its shares may continue to be pressured if the bond market bids interest rates lower, the bond market knows exactly where interest rates are going to be headed and financials should be following along.

While the premiums aren’t spectacular, I would look at a potential purchase of shares with an eye toward a longer term holding trying to capitalize on share gains supplemented by option premiums while awaiting the reality of rate increases to come.

Traditional Stocks: Sinclair Broadcasting

Momentum Stocks: Bank of America

Double-Dip Dividend: Comcast (6/29), Dow Chemical (6/26), Philip Morris (6/23)

Premiums Enhanced by Earnings: Blackberry (6/23 AM)

Remember, these are just guidelines for the coming week. The above selections may become actionable, most often coupling a share purchase with call option sales or the sale of covered put contracts, in adjustment to and consideration of market movements. The overriding objective is to create a healthy income stream for the week with reduction of trading risk.

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Copyright 2015 TheAcsMan

Weekend Update – March 15, 2015

Anyone who has seen the classic movie “Casablanca” will recall the cynicism of the scene in which Captain Renault says “I’m shocked, shocked to find that gambling is going on in here!” seconds before the croupier hands him his winnings from earlier.

This week, the Chief Global Investment Strategist of Blackrock (NYSE:BLK) in attempting to explain a sell-off earlier in the week said “You’ve got the dollar up about 23 percent from the summer lows, and people are realizing this is starting to bite into earnings.”

No doubt that a stronger US Dollar can have unwanted adverse consequences, but exactly what people was Russ Koesterich referring to that had only that morning come to that realization?

How in the world could people such as Koesterich and others responsible for managing huge funds and portfolios possibly have been caught off guard?

Was he perhaps instead suggesting that somehow small investors around the nation suddenly all had the same epiphany and logged into their workplace 401(k) accounts in order to massively dump their mutual fund shares in unison and sufficient volume prior to the previous day’s closing bell?

Somehow that doesn’t sound very likely.

I can vaguely understand how a some-what dull witted middle school aged child might not be familiar with the consequences of a strengthening dollar, especially in an economy that runs a trade deficit, but Koesterich could only have been referring to those who were capable of moving markets in such magnitude and in such short time order. There shouldn’t be too much doubt that those people incapable of seeing the downstream impacts of a strengthening US Dollar aren’t the ones likely to be influencing market direction upon their sudden realization.

Maybe it just doesn’t really matter when it’s “other people’s money” and it is really just a game and a question of pushing a sell button.

This past week was another in which news took a back seat to fears and the fear of an imminent interest rate increase seems to be increasingly taking hold just at the same time as the currency exchange issue is getting its long overdue attention.

While there are still a handful of companies of importance to report earnings this quarter, the next earnings season begins in just 3 weeks. If Intel (NASDAQ:INTC) is any reflection, there may be any number of companies getting in line to broadcast earnings warnings to take some of the considerable pressure off the actual earnings release.

The grammatically incorrect, but burning question that I would have asked Russ Koesterich during his interview would have been “And this comes to you as a surprise, why?”

In the meantime, however, those interest rate concerns seem to have been holding the stock market hostage as the previous week’s Employment Situation report is still strengthening the belief that interest rate increases are on the near horizon, despite any lack of indication from Janet Yellen. In addition, the past week saw rates on the 10 Year Treasury Note decrease considerably and Retail Sales fell for yet another month, even while gasoline prices were increasing.

The coming week’s FOMC meeting may provide some clarity by virtue of just occurring. With so many focusing on the word “patience” in the FOMC Statement, whether it remains or is removed will offer reason to move forward as either way the answer to the “sooner or later” question will be answered.

Still, it surprises me, having grown up believing the axiom that the stock market discounts events 6 months into the future, that it has come to the point that fairly well established economic cycles, such as the impact of changing currency exchange rates on earnings, isn’t something that had long been taken into account. Even without a crystal ball, the fact that early in this current earnings season companies were already beginning to factor in currency headwinds and tempering earnings and guidance, should at least served as a clue.

As usual, the week’s potential stock selections are classified as being in Traditional, Double Dip Dividend, Momentum or “PEE” categories.

Years ago, before spinning off its European operations, Altria (NYSE:MO) was one of my favorite companies. While I have to qualify that, lest anyone believed that their core business was the reason for my favor, it was simply a company whose shares I always wanted to trade.

In academic medicine we used to refer to the vaunted “triple threats.” That was someone who was an esteemed researcher, clinician and teacher. There really aren’t very many of those kind of people. While Altria may represent the antithesis to what a triple threat in medicine is dedicated toward, it used to be a triple threat in its own right. It had a great dividend, great option premiums and the ability to have share appreciation, as well.

That changed once Phillip Morris (NYSE:PM) went on its own and the option premiums on the remainder of Altria became less and less appealing, even as the dividend stayed the course. I found less and less reason to own shares after the split.

However, lately there has been some life appearing in those premiums at a time that shares have fallen nearly 10% in just 2 weeks. With the company re-affirming its FY 2015 guidance just a week ago, unless it too has a sudden realization that its now much smaller foreign operations and businesses will result in currency exchange losses, it may be relatively immune from what may ail many others as currency parity becomes more and more of a reality.

Lately, American Express (NYSE:AXP) can’t seem to do anything right. I say that, as both my wife and I registered our first complaints with them after more than 30 years of membership. Fascinatingly, the events were unrelated and neither of us consulted
with the other, or shared information about the issues at hand, before contacting the company.

My wife, who tends to be very low maintenance, was nearly apoplectic after being passed to 11 different people, some of whom acted very “Un-American Express- like.”

The preceding is anecdotal and meaningless information, for sure, but makes me wonder about a company that received a premium for its use by virtue of its service.

With the loss of its largest co-branding partner to take effect in 2016, American Express has already sent out notices to some customers of its intent to increase interest rates on those accounts that are truly credit cards, but my guess is that revenue enhancements won’t be sufficient to offset the revenue loss from the partnership dissolution.

To that end the investing world will laud American Express for its workforce cutbacks that will certainly occur at some point, and service will as certainly decline until that point that the consumers go elsewhere for their credit needs.

That is known as a cycle. The sort of cycle that perhaps highly paid money managers are unable to recognize, until like currency headwinds, it hits them on the head.

Still, the newly introduced uncertainty into its near term and longer term prospects has again made American Express a potentially attractive covered option candidate, as it has just announced a dividend increase and a nearly $7 billion share buyback.

Based on its falling stock price, you would think that Las Vegas Sands (NYSE:LVS) hasn’t been able to do anything right of late, either.

Sometimes your fortunes are defined on the basis of either being at the right place at the right time or the wrong place at the wrong time. For the moment, Macao is the wrong place and this is the wrong time. However, despite the downturn of fortunes for those companies that placed their bets on Macao, somehow Las Vegas Sands has found the wherewithal to increase its quarterly dividend and is now at 5%, yet with a payout ratio that is sustainable.

The company also has operating and profit margins that would make others, with or without exposure to Macao envious, yet its shares continue to follow the experiences of the much smaller and poorer performing Wynn Resorts (NASDAQ:WYNN). That probably bothers Sheldon Adelson to no end, while it likely delights Steve Wynn, who would rather suffer with friends.

With shares going ex-dividend this week and trading near its yearly low, it’s hard to imagine news from Macao getting much worse, particularly as China is beginning to play the interest rate game in efforts to stimulate the economy. The risk, however, is still there and is reflected in the option premium.

Given the risk – benefit proposition, I ask myself “WWSD?”

What would Sheldon Do?

My guess is that he would be betting on his company to do more than just tread water at these levels.

The Gap (NYSE:GPS) fascinates me.

I don’t think I’ve ever been in one of their stores, but I know their brand names and occasionally make mental notes about the parking conditions in front of their stores. Those activities are absolutely meaningless, as are The Gap’s monthly sales reports.

I don’t think that I can recall any other company that so regularly alternates between being out of touch with what the consumer wants and being in complete synchrony. At least that’s how those monthly sales statistics are routinely interpreted and share prices goes predictably back and forth.

The good thing about all of the non-sense is that the opportunities to benefit from enhanced option premiums actually occurs up to 5 times in a 3 month period extending from one earnings report to the next, as the monthly same store sales reports also have enhanced premiums. With an upcoming dividend during the same week as the next same store sales report in early April 2015, this is a potential position that I’d consider selling a longer term option, in order to take advantage of the upcoming volatility, collect the dividend and perhaps have some additional time for the price to recoup if it reacts adversely.

MetLife (NYSE:MET) has been trading in a range lately that has simply been following interest rates for the most part. As it awaits a decision on its challenge to being designated as “systemically important” it probably is wishing for rate increases to come as quickly as possible so that it can put as much of its assets to productive use as quickly as possible before the inevitable constraints on its assets become a reality.

With interest rate jitters and uncertainty over the eventual judicial decision, MetLife’s option premiums are higher than is typically the case. However, in the world of my ideal youth, the stock market would have already discounted the probabilities of future interest rate increases and the upheld designation of the company as being systemically important.

With Intel’s announcement, this wasn’t a particularly good week for “old technology.” For Seagate Technolgy (NASDAQ:STX) the difficulties this week were just a continuation since its disappointing earnings in January. After its earnings plunge and an attempted bounce back, it is now nearly 9% lower than at the depth of its initial January drop.

That continued drop in share price is finally returning shares to a level that is getting my attention. With its dividend, which is very generous and appears to be safe, still two months away, Seagate Technology may be a good candidate for the sale of put contracts and if opening such a position and faced with assignment, I would consider trying to rollover as long as possible, either resulting in an eventual expiration of the position or being assigned and then in a position to collect the dividend.

Finally, for an unprecedented fourth consecutive week, I’m going to consider adding shares of United Continental (NYSE:UAL) as energy prices have recaptured its earlier lows. Those lows are good for UAL and other airlines and by and large the share prices of UAL and representative oil companies have moved in opposite directions.

I had shares of UAL assigned again this past Friday, as part of a pairs kind of trade established a few weeks ago. I still hold the energy shares, which have slumped in the past few weeks, but would be eager to once again add UAL shares at any pullback that might occur with a bounce back in energy prices.

The volatility and uncertainty inherent in shares of UAL has made it possible to buy shares and sell deep in the money calls and still make a respectable return for the week, if assigned.

That’s a risk – reward proposition that’s relatively easy to embrace, even as the risk is considerable.

 

Traditional Stocks: Altria, American Express, MetLife, The Gap

Momentum Stocks: Seagate Technology, United Continental

Double Dip Dividend: Las Vegas Sands (3/19)

Premiums Enhanced by Earnings: none

Remember, these are just guidelines for the coming week. The above selections may become actionable, most often coupling a share purchase with call option sales or the sale of covered put contracts, in adjustment to and consideration of market movements. The overriding objective is to create a healthy income stream for the week with reduction of trading risk.

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Copyright 2015 TheAcsMan

Weekend Update – November 24, 2013

Sometimes the strategy is self-defense. Sometimes it’s just doing what you need to do to keep beta at bay.

I don’t know about other people, but I’m getting a little more nervous than usual watching stocks break the 16000 level on the Dow Jones and the 1800 level on the S&P 500.

What’s next 5000 NASDAQ? Well that’s not so ludicrous. All it would take is 4 years of 6% gains and we would could set the time machine back to a different era.

In hindsight I know what I would do at the 5000 level.

For those old enough to remember the predictions of Dow 35000 all we need is a repeat of the past 56 months and we’re finally there and beyond.

This being a holiday shortened trading week adds a little bit to the stress level, because of the many axioms you hear about the markets. The one that I believe has as much validity as the best of them is that low volume can create artificially large market moves. When so many are instead focusing on the historical strength of markets during the coming week, I prefer to steer clear of any easy guide to riches.

When faced with a higher and higher moving market you could be equally justified in believing that momentum is hard to stop as you could believe that an inflection point is being approached. The one pattern that appears clear of late is that a number of momentum stocks are quickly decelerating when faced with challenges.

When I find myself a little ill at ease with the market’s height, I focus increasingly on “beta,” the measure of a stock’s systemic risk compared to the overall market. I want to steer clear of stock’s that may reasonably be expected to be more volatile during a down market or expectations of a declining market.

As a tool to characterize short term risk beta can be helpful, if only various sources would calculate the value in a consistent fashion. For example, Tesla (TSLA), which many would agree is a “momentum” stock, can be found to have a beta ranging from 0.33 to 1.5. In other words, depending upon your reference source you can walk away believing that either Tesla is 50% more volatile than the market or 67% less volatile.

Your pick.

While “momentum” and “beta” don’t necessarily have correlation, common sense is helpful. Tesla or any other hot stock du jour, despite a reported beta of 0.33, just doesn’t seem to be 67% less volatile than the overall market, regardless of what kind of spin Elon Musk might put on the risk.

During the Thanksgiving holiday week I don’t anticipate opening too many new positions and am focusing on those with low beta and meeting my common sense criteria with regard to risk. Having had many assignments to close out the November 2013 option cycle I decided to spread out my new purchases over successive weeks rather than plow everything back in at one time and risk inadvertently discovering the market’s peak.

Additionally, I’m more likely to look at either expanded option possibilities or monthly options, rather than the weekly variety this week. In part that’s due to the low premiums for the week, but also to concerns about having positions with options expiring this week caught in a possible low volume related downdraft and then being unable to find suitable new option opportunities in future weeks. If my positions aren’t generating revenue they’re not very helpful to me.

As usual, the week’s potential stock selections are classified as being in Traditional, Double Dip Dividend, Momentum and “PEE” categories this week (see details).

While eschewing risk may be in order when you think a market top is at hand, sometimes risky behavior can be just the thing when it comes to assembling a potentially profitable mix of stocks. In this case the risky behavior comes from the customers of Lorillard (LO), Philip Morris (PM) and Molson-Coors (TAP).

With word that Europeans may finally be understanding the risks associated with tobacco and may be decreasing use of their ubiquitously held cigarettes, Philip Morris shares had a rough week. The 6% drop accompanying what should be good news from a public health perspective brings shares back to a much more inviting level. Shares did successfully test an $85 support level and subsequently bounced back a bit too much for my immediate interest, but I would welcome another move toward that level, particularly as I would prefer an entry cost right near a monthly strike level.

Lorillard, on the other hand, has essentially no European exposure, but perhaps in sympathy gave up just a little bit from its 52 week high after a sustained run higher over the past 6 weeks. While there is certainly downside risk in the event of a lower moving market, shares do go ex-dividend this week and think of all of those people lighting up after a hearty Thanksgiving meal. The near term risk factors identified for Europe aren’t likely to have much of an impact in the United States market, where the only real risk factors may be use of the products.

That Thanksgiving meal may very well be complemented with a product from Molson Coors. I imagine there will also be those using a Molson Coors product while using a Lorillard product, perhaps even dousing one in the other. Shares, which are down nearly 5% from its recent highs go ex-dividend this week. Because of the strike prices available, Molson Coors is one position that I may consider using a November 29, 2013 option contract, as many more strike levels are available, something that is useful when attempting to capture both a decent option premium and the dividend, while also enticing assignment of shares.

Speaking of risky behavior, the one exception to the central theme of staying away from high beta names is the consideration of adding shares of Walter Energy (WLT). While the last 9 months have seen its shares plummet, the last three months have been particularly exciting as shares had gone up by as much as 75%. For those with some need for excitement this is certainly a candidate, with a beta value 170% greater than the average of all other recommended positions this week, the stock is no stranger to movement. But speaking of movement, although I don’t look at charts in any depth, there appears to be a collision in the making as the 50 dma is approaching the 200 dma from below. Technicians believe that is a bullish indicator. Who knows. What I do know is that the coal, steel and iron complex, despite a downgrade this past Friday of the steel sector, has been building a higher base and I believe that the recent pullback in Walter Energy is just a good opportunity for a quick trade, perhaps using the sale of puts rather than covered calls.

While not falling into the category of risky behavior, Intel’s (INTC) price movement this week certainly represents odd behavior. Not being prone to exceptionally large moves of late on Thursday it soared 3%, which by Intel’s standards really is soaring. It then fell nearly 6% the following day. While the fall was really not so odd given that Intel forecast flat revenues and flat operating profits, it was odd that the price had gone up so much the previous day. Buying on Thursday, in what may have been a frenzied battle for shares was a nice example of how to turn a relatively low risk investment into one that has added risk.

But with all of the drama out of the way Intel is now back to a more reasonable price and allows the ability to repurchase shares assigned the previous week at $24 or to just start a new position.

While I would have preferred that Joy Global (JOY) had retreated even further from its recent high, its one year chart is a nearly perfect image of shares that had spent the first 6 months of the year above the current price and the next 6 months below the current price, other than for a brief period in each half year when the relationship was reversed. Joy GLobal is an example of stock have a wide range of beta reported, as well, going from 1.14 to 2.17. However, it has also traded in a relatively narrow range for the past 6 months, albeit currently near the high end of that range.

With earnings scheduled later in the December 2013 option cycle there is an opportunity to attempt to thread a needle and capture the dividend the week before earnings and avoid the added risk. However, I think that Joy Global’s business, which is more heavily reliant on the Chinese economy may return to its recent highs as earnings are delivered.

Lowes (LOW) reported earnings this past week, and like every previous quarter since the dawn of time the Home Depot (HD) versus Lowes debate was in full force and for yet another quarter Lowes demonstrated itself to be somewhat less capable in the profit department. However, after its quick return to pricing reality, Lowes is once again an appealing portfolio addition. I generally prefer considering adding shares prior to the ex-dividend date, but the share price slide is equally compelling.

Hewlett Packard (HPQ) is one of those stragglers that has yet to report earnings, but does so this week. Had I known 35 years ago that a classmate would end up marrying its future CEO, I would likely not have joined in on the jokes. It is also one of those companies that I swore that I would never own again as it was one of my 2012 tax loss positions. I tend to hold grudges, but may be willing to consider selling puts prior to earnings, although the strike price delivering a 1% ROI, which is my typical threshold, is barely outside of the implied price move range of 8%. It’s not entirely clear to me where Hewlett Packard’s future path may lead, but with a time perspective of just a week, I’m not overly concerned about the future of the personal computer, even if Intel’s forecasts have ramifications for the entire industry.

Lexmark (LXK) is a company that I like to consider owning when there is also an opportunity to capture a dividend. That happens to be the case this week. When it announced that it was getting out of the printer business investors reacted much as you would have imagined. They dumped shares, which for most people are electronically maintained and not in printed form. After all, why own a printer company that says that printers are a dead end business? Who knew that Lexmark had other things in mind, as it has done quite nicely focusing on business process and content management solutions. While it has been prone to large earnings related moves or when shocking the investment community with such news as it was abandoning its most recognizable line of business, it has also been a rewarding position, owing to dividends and option premiums. However, always attendant is the possibility of a large news related move that may require some patience in awaiting recovery.

Finally, I find myself thinking about adding shares of eBay (EBAY) again this week, just as last week and 10 other times this past year. Perhaps I’m just obsessed with another CEO related missed opportunity. Shares didn’t fare too well based upon an analyst’s report that downgraded the company saying that shares were “range bound at $49-$54.” While that may have been the equivalent of a death siren, for me that was just validation of what had been behind the decision to purchase and repurchase shares of eBay on a regular basis. While being range bound is an anathema to most stock investors, it is a dream come true to a covered option writer.

Happy Thanksgiving.

Traditional Stocks: eBay, Intel, Lowes, Philip Morris

Momentum Stocks: Joy Global, Walter Energy

Double Dip Dividend: Lexmark (ex-div 11/26), Lorillard (ex-div 11/26), Molson-Coors (ex-div 11/26)

Premiums Enhanced by Earnings: Hewlett Packard (11/26 PM)

Remember, these are just guidelines for the coming week. The above selections may become actionable, most often coupling a share purchase with call option sales or the sale of covered put contracts, in adjustment to and consideration of market movements. The overriding objective is to create a healthy income stream for the week with reduction of trading risk.

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Weekend Update – September 15, 2013

Month after month of seeing market gains finally came to an end in August. The streak had started in November 2012 and for those who are prone to remember oddities, we even had a string of 20 consecutive gaining Tuesdays during that span.

Of course we also eclipsed the 2007 Dow Jones and S&P 500 highs and subsequently did so on repeated occasions, all while “Chicken Littles” like me kept waiting for the correction that never came.

The small head fake correction that began near the end of May was barely a blip and was quickly erased as more new highs were established, but the trading patterns of August seemed to indicate that perhaps the rally was getting tired and the market not only began sputtering, but also lost ground as Syrian related tensions were in the air.

Anxious to see a modest correction so that I would finally have something constructive to do with the cash I had been raising, I wasn’t terribly happy with what would come in September, with the first seven trading days having seen gains.

Not only did they make gains, but there were three consecutive triple digit gains. Adding insult to injury was the root cause of those triple digit gains.

While avoiding the use of military force, at least in the near term, is somewhat comforting, the very idea that a Russian proposed plan could avert military action against Syria was about as implausible as anything that occurred in the 20th or 21st centuries, with the possible exception of the Russian President speaking directly to American citizens through an op-ed piece in the New York TImes (NYT).

Russian peace plan? Can those words even possibly all be in a single paragraph?

But with fear centered around uncertainty regarding military action against Syria temporarily tabled, the market ignored August and also ignored the historical nature of Septembers past. By Friday morning, just seconds after the opening bell, all of August’s losses had been recovered.

Somehow, I am neurologically incapable of saying “Thank you, Vladimir.”

Instead, the increasingly nervous part of me wonders what there is that awaits that will continue to send markets higher? Are there unseen catalysts or are there now more opportunities for disappointment, particularly if Russian efforts, inspired by an off the cuff remark by Secretary of State Kerry, prove to be inadequate?

I’ve been asking questions in a similar vein for months now, but the answer has always been in the affirmative, even if the catalysts weren’t always apparent.

Of course, now there’s also the question of the market’s reaction to the expected announcement of the nomination of Lawrence Summers as the next Federal Reserve Chairman. The rumor that such an announcement would come today was denied, but that should come as no surprise, as President Obama had his heart set on doing so by attaching a banner to a Tomahawk missile.

If Syria fails to deliver a market correction and neither fear of the “Taper” nor the nomination of Summers can do so, at least we will have Congress back and fully engaged so that a new round of budget crises can at least allow the market to bounce up and down, which is far more healthy for someone relying on a covered option strategy. If that happens, I can hold my head up high and point to a momentary drop lower and sat “See? That correction.”

As usual, the week’s potential stock selections are classified as being in Traditional, Double Dip Dividend, Momentum and “PEE” categories this week (see details).

I’ve only opened a limited number of new positions in the last few weeks and don’t anticipate seeing that pattern change this week, unless there is a substantive near term correction to last week’s price increases. Those increases, for example, are the reason why I have no Double Dip Dividend selections this coming week, as the risk of experiencing some price pullbacks outweighs the benefits of garnering option premiums and dividends. As it is, instead of the usual number of potential selections, this week’s list contains only 5 names.

Certainly a controversial place to begin looking in the new week is Apple (AAPL). I purchased shares last week following the large drop on Wednesday when disappointment began to settle in for varied reasons. The small recovery that I was expecting never really came, but instead of being disappointed by the inability to quickly close my position, I think that there is simply continued opportunity to pick up additional shares. However, as opposed to the rare instance of having purchased shares and not immediately having sold calls, I do plan to do so this time around if adding shares.

Apple, while not necessarily making significant changes to its product line is making significant changes to the way it conducts its business. From a trade-in program, to less expensive models, to not taking pre-orders on the upcoming iPhone 5S, to dividends and buybacks, they are shaking up their daily approach to existence on all fronts. From my vantage point the short term emphasis is that “cash is king” and that share price matters. I especially like Tim Cook’s philosophy that market share isn’t as important as having enough money to be in control of one’s destiny. The recent product announcements should see to it that the cash keeps pouring in and helps to secure that destiny.

Continuing with the controversial theme is Cliffs Natural Resources (CLF). I had written about the possibility of adding shares recently, but did not do so. Instead, I continued selling calls on a lower priced lot of shares to try and continue to offset substantial paper losses from older lots. That’s a slow process but I think at this current level the process can be speeded up by adding more shares. Highly levered to economic news from China does add to the risk of ownership, but Cliffs has been demonstrating some price stability at this level.

I may as well add to the controversy with Phillip Morris (PM). Whatever your opinions are about ownership of a company that directly results in countless premature deaths, it’s hard to overlook their move to increase the dividend and the reasonably narrow range in which shares trade. Combine those attributes with an appealing option premium and you have a combination that’s hard to resist and doesn’t even require nicotine to keep you hooked.

They say that there’s no such thing as bad publicity, although JP Morgan (JPM) may disagree. However, if you want to see the poster child for resilience you don’t have to look much further than this company. After an avalanche of bad news, having inherited the burden from Goldman Sachs (GS), JP Morgan has somehow been able to keep its share price respectably positioned. This week it announced plans to commit nearly $6 Billion toward legal defenses and compliance. In addition to an option premium that provides some comfort, shares will be ex-dividend during the October 2013 option cycle so I may consider using a longer term option sale and would actually welcome early assignment.

Finally, while earnings season is set to begin again in just a few weeks, Oracle (ORCL) is a laggard and reports this week. With the upcoming report the company will have had six months to make some changes, whether substantive or purely optical, to create a more positively received report. Following two successive negative reports that were not well received by the market, I think that its inconceivable that Larry Ellison would allow his name to be badly tarnished again by anything other than his own words and actions. No doubt that he is unhappy with share performance since that first disappointment.

While I usually like to consider earnings related trades on the basis of selling deep out of the money puts, Oracle may work equally well as an outright purchase and sale of calls. In the event of another price meltdown I would not go out of my way to greet Ellison if you see him in Lanai, although I don’t believe the police department was included with the sale of the island.

Traditional Stocks: JP Morgan Chase, Phillip Morris

Momentum Stocks: Apple, Cliffs Natural Resources

Double Dip Dividend: none

Premiums Enhanced by Earnings: Oracle (9/11 PM)

Remember, these are just guidelines for the coming week. The above selections may be become actionable, most often coupling a share purchase with call option sales or the sale of covered put contracts, in adjustment to and consideration of market movements. The over-riding objective is to create a healthy income stream for the week with reduction of trading risk.

Disclosure: I am long AAPL, CLF. I wrote this article myself, and it expresses my own opinions. I am not receiving compensation for it (other than from Seeking Alpha). I have no business relationship with any company whose stock is mentioned in this article.

Additional disclosure: I may initiate positions, add shares or sell puts in AAPL, CLF, JPM, ORCL and PM

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Weekend Update – June 30, 2013

The hard part about looking for new positions this week is that memories are still fresh of barely a week ago when we got a glimpse of where prices could be.

When it comes to short term memory the part that specializes in stock prices is still functioning and it doesn’t allow me to forget that the concept of lower does still exist.

The salivating that I recall doing a week ago was not related to the maladies that accompany my short term memory deficits. Instead it was due to the significantly lower share prices.

For the briefest of moments the market was down about 6% from its May 2013 high, but just as quickly those bargains disappeared.

I continue to beat a dead horse, that is that the behavior of our current market is eerily reminiscent of 2012. Certainly we saw the same kind of quick recovery from a quick, but relatively small drop last year.

What would be much more eerie is if following the recovery the market replicated the one meaningful correction for that year which came fresh off the hooves of the recovery.

I promise to make no more horse references.

Although, there is always that possibility that we are seeing a market reminiscent of 1982, except that a similar stimulus as seen in 1982 is either lacking or has neigh been identified yet. In that case the market just keeps going higher.

I listened to a trader today or was foaming at the mouth stating how our markets can only go higher from here. He based his opinion on “multiples” saying that our current market multiple is well below the 25 times we saw back when Soviet missiles were being pointed at us.

I’ll bet you that he misses “The Gipper,” but I’ll also bet that he didn’t consider the possibility that perhaps the 25 multiple was the irrational one and that perhaps our current market multiple is appropriate, maybe even over-valued.

But even if I continue to harbor thoughts of a lower moving market, there’s always got to be some life to be found. Maybe it’s just an involuntary twitch, but it doesn’t take much to raise hope.

As usual, the week’s potential stock selections are classified as being in Traditional, Double Dip Dividend or Momentum categories. With earnings season set to begin July 8, 0213, there are only a handful of laggards reporting this coming week, none of which appear risk worthy (see details).

I wrote an article last week, Wintel for the Win, focusing on Intel (INTC) and Microsoft (MSFT). This week I’m again in a position to add more shares of Intel, as my most recent lots were assigned last week. Despite its price having gone up during the past week, I think that there is still more upside potential and even in a declining market it will continue to out-perform. While I rarely like to repurchase at higher prices, this is one position that warrants a little bit of chasing.

While Intel is finally positioning itself to make a move into mobile and tablets and ready to vanquish an entire new list of competitors, Texas Instruments (TXN) is a consistent performer. My only hesitancy would be related to earnings, which are scheduled to be announced on the first day of the August 2013 cycle. Texas Instruments has a habit of making large downward moves on earnings, as the market always seems to be disappointed. With the return of the availability of weekly options I may be more inclined to consider that route, although I may also consider the August options in order to capitalize somewhat on premiums enhanced by earnings anticipation.

Already owning shares of Pfizer (PFE) and Merck (MRK), I don’t often own more than one pharmaceutical company at a time. However, this week both Eli Lilly (LLY) and Abbott Labs (ABT) may join the portfolio. Their recent charts are similar, having shown some weakness, particularly in the case of Lilly. While Abbott carries some additional risk during the July 2013 option cycle because it will report earnings, it also will go ex-dividend during the cycle. However, Lilly’s larger share drop makes it more appealing to me if only considering a single purchase, although I might also consider selling an August 2013 option even though weekly contracts are available.

I always seem to find myself somewhat apologetic when considering a purchase of shares like Phillip Morris (PM). I learned to segregate business from personal considerations a long time ago, but I still have occasional qualms. But it is the continued ability of people to disregard that which is harmful that allows companies like Phillip Morris and Lorillard (LO), which I also currently own, to be the cockroaches of the market. They will survive any kind of calamity. It’s recent under-performance makes it an attractive addition to a portfolio, particularly if the market loses some ground, thereby encouraging all of those nervous smokers to sadly rekindle their habits.

The last time I purchased Walgreens (WAG) was one of the very few times in the past year or two that I didn’t immediately sell a call to cover the shares. Then, as now, shares took, what I believed to be an unwarranted large drop following the release of earnings, which I believed offered an opportunity to capture both capital gains and option premiums during a short course of share ownership. It looks as if that kind of opportunity has replicated itself after the most recent earnings release.

Among the sectors that took a little bit of a beating last week were the financials. The opportunity that I had been looking for to re-purchase shares of JP Morgan Chase (JPM) disappeared quickly and did so before I was ready to commit additional cash reserves stored up just for the occasion. While shares have recovered they are still below their recent highs. If JP Morgan was not going ex-dividend this trade shortened week, I don’t believe that I would be considering purchasing shares. However, it may offer an excellent opportunity to take advantage of some option pricing discrepancies.

I rarely use anecdotal experience as a reason to consider purchasing shares, but an upcoming ex-dividend date on Darden Restaurants (DRI) has me taking another look. I was recently in a “Seasons 52” restaurant, which was packed on a Saturday evening. I was surprised when I learned that it was owned by Darden. It was no Red Lobster. It was subsequently packed again on a Sunday evening. WHile clearly a small portion of Darden’s chains the volume of cars in their parking lots near my home is always impressive. While my channel check isn’t terribly scientific it’s recent share drop following earnings gives me reason to believe that much of the excess has already been removed from shares and that the downside risk is minimized enough for an entry at this level.

While I did consider purchasing shares of Conoco Phillips (COP) last week, I didn’t make that purchase. Instead, this week I’ve turned my attention back to its more volatile namesake, Phillips 66 (PSX) which it had spun off just a bit more than a year ago. It has been a stellar performer in that time, despite having fallen nearly 15% since its March high and 10% since the market’s own high. It fulfills my need to find those companies that have fared more poorly than the overall market but that have a demonstrated ability to withstand some short term adverse price movements.

Finally, I haven’t recommended the highly volatile silver ETN products for quite a while, even though I continue to trade them for my personal accounts. However, with the sustained movement of silver downward, I think it is time for the cycle to reverse, much as it had done earlier this year. The divergence between the performance of the two leveraged funds, ProShares UltraShort Silver ETN (ZSL) and the ProShares Ultra Silver ETN (AGQ) are as great as I have seen in recent years. I don’t think that divergence is sustainable an would consider either the sale of puts on AGQ or outright purchase of the shares and the sale of calls, but only for the very adventurous.

Traditional Stocks: Abbott Labs, Eli Lilly, Intel, Mosaic, Phillip Morris, Texas Instruments, Walgreens

Momentum Stocks: Phillips 66, ProShares UltraSilver ETN

Double Dip Dividend: Darden Restaurants (ex-div 7/8), JP Morgan (ex-div 7/2)

Premiums Enhanced by Earnings: none

Remember, these are just guidelines for the coming week. Some of the above selections may be sent to Option to Profit subscribers as actionable Trading Alerts, most often coupling a share purchase with call option sales or the sale of covered put contracts. Alerts are sent in adjustment to and consideration of market movements, in an attempt to create a healthy income stream for the week with reduction of trading risk.

 

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Copyright 2013 TheAcsMan